Thursday, May 28, 2015

Many hands make light work

During our previous tour of Bangalore's metro, we experienced a top-down approach of how to improve a city. Contrary to that tour, today we discovered that bottom-up, individual efforts can have an equally positive impact.
During our previous tour of Bangalore's metro, we experienced a top-down approach of how to improve a city.

Contrary to that tour, today we discovered that bottom-up, individual efforts can have an equally positive impact.

Today we worked with a group called The Ugly Indian, an organization with the philosophy that too many citizens complain about issues such as littering, crumbling sidewalks, and dirty walls instead of taking action.

The Ugly Indian organizes citizens to change their neighborhoods for the better. Once an area has been cleaned up, it tends to remain clean. Similarly, an existing pile of garbage suggests that it's socially acceptable to litter there (aka the "broken window theory").

When we first saw our work site, we noticed trash piles, burnt rubbish, broken and uneven sidewalk bricks, and the overall uncleanliness we've become accustomed to seeing in parts of Bangalore.

We quickly got to work picking up garbage, scooping up dirt, planting ivy, painting walls, and laying bricks.

image.jpg

image (1).jpeg

image (2).jpg

By the end of the morning, we had completely transformed the space.

image (3).jpeg

image (4).jpeg

Working with The Ugly Indian taught us that you don't have to wait for an administration or government to change a situation for you. As citizens of a democratic society, we have more power than we often realize.

Gandhi is famously quoted for saying "Be the change you want to see in the world." After today, we felt a greater sense of empowerment and capability to be initiators of change rather than complainers.

No comments:

Post a Comment